Tag Archives: Richard III

Looking on lovers

Throughout history the rich, especially royalty have used the medium of stained glass to promote their image. The relationship between monarch and stained glass is explored in depth in The King’s Glass: A Story of Tudor Power and Secret Art (2007) by Carola Hicks if you are interested in such things. It’s a genuinely interesting read about the secret messages woven into public stained glass to spread particular images of the monarch, propaganda almost. I, of course, am interested in the queens who rarely feature as much as their husbands in the public image. So I have collated this gallery of lovers for your viewing pleasure… Continue reading

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The History of the White Queen: The Princes in the Tower

The disappearance of the two princes is one of the most enduring mysteries in history and thus has inspired a great deal of related fiction.

The disappearance of the two princes is one of the most enduring mysteries in history and thus has inspired a great deal of related fiction.

The White Queen finishes airing in the UK on Sunday, and so I can resume non Plantagenet blogging, while wondering how on earth they are going to fit so much of the final year of Richard III including the deaths of his son, wife, an alleged affair with his niece and the battle of Bosworth in an hour long episode?
In the last episode we saw the deaths of the princes in the tower; Edward V and Richard, Duke of York, at the orders of Margaret Beaufort and the hand of the Duke of Buckingham. Since then I have had a couple of emails asking me if Margaret Beaufort killed the princes, why do so many people still think Richard did it? Welcome to the world of historical fiction.
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The History of The White Queen: Anne Neville

Anne Neville, strong female character, historically known for doing what she was told.

Anne Neville, strong female character, historically known for doing what she was told.

If you had told me some months ago that Anne Neville, one of the most unassuming women in history; a woman who, despite being queen, left no hint of a legacy, would become one of the most popular heroines in modern historical fiction, I would have looked at you stupidly and asked, ‘how?’. Now some months later, Anne Neville is one of the most popular heroines in modern historical fiction and at the risk of making myself hilariously unpopular, I am still asking ‘how?’.
Information on Anne is surprisingly sparse, especially considering she became queen, and there is very little available regarding her time as Queen of England. It is probably because of this that The White Queen can fill in the rather large gaps between our knowledge of her movements with such dramatic fiction.
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